Game of Numbers #6 – Lucy Broze as a Floating 8

FC Barcelona Femení had a slow start to their first match of the season, initially struggling to find avenues forward in Tenerife's 5-4-1 defensive block. UD Granadilla Tenerife compacted the lines both vertically and horizontally to stunt Barcelona's progress forward, but in an abnormally high-line that spurred Giráldez's team to hit long passes over the top. They were caught offside from these attempts time and time again, particularly in their quest to spray in behind for Geyse's speed. But then, everything changed.

Explaining the Creative Ten – Player Role Analysis

When we say 'Creative Ten', I'm sure you immediately conjure up an image of a classical painter of a player, who wonderfully creates art with their passing and incisiveness in the final third. But as has been well documented over the past few years, that type of player does not tend to exist in the modern game. The Mesut Ozil's, David Silva's and Cesc Fabregas's of this world no longer tend to exist as they once did, or play in the same positions that they once held. Nowadays, 'number ten's' must not only be capable contributors in the final third, but highly active in pressing from the front, and contributing to rotations that spread the width of the pitch.

Marco Silva – Fulham – Tactical Analysis

Preceding one of the most dominant Championship seasons ever, Marco Silva's Fulham have shown plenty of promise on their yo-yo return to the Premier League. 106 goals in 46 matches was superior of any second-tier side since Manchester City in the 2001/02 season, but their offensive strengths had been heightened by their ex-Portuguese star, Fabio Carvalho. As he begins a new chapter at Anfield, the rest of Silva's side have reset, and look well-prepared for a high-tempo season in the top flight. Peculiarly, they've shown more defensive promise so far even with the explosive start to the season from their Serbian record-breaker, Aleksandar Mitrović.

Why South American players tend to fail at Manchester United (Part 2)

Following Manchester United’s first nine South American signings that were bought between 2000 and 2010, the club then purchased 11 more between 2011 and 2020. Those 11 purchases during the 2010s cost the club approximately £158.3 million in transfer fees, plus millions more in yearly wages. Over the last 10 years, inflation has greatly impacted the price of football transfers. Wealthy clubs began flexing their financial muscles more than ever in order to acquire various top-quality and in-demand players, which in turn has resulted in continuously increasing transfer fees.